Tips and Tricks for Attalus.org

Attalus.org is a great source for online translations of ancient authors.  The site also has translations of some Greek inscriptions, plus a list of all the events that happened in any year from 324-30 BCE.  The ancient authors section includes late Roman writers, but the rest of the site is limited to the Greek/Hellenistic world and the Roman Republic.  Attalus.org is relatively easy to navigate (they even have a How-To Page), but I would like to draw your attention to some of the site’s features.

From the Homepage, you can navigate through the various sections of the site:

 

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

We love the Dying Gaul theme!

 

First there is a list of events that happen in any given year from 324 BCE through 30 BCE. Clicking on the link for the Third Century B.C. brings up a grid with every year in that century:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

If you want to know everything that happened in the year 202 BCE (for example), you can click on link for the year (at the bottom right of the image). You’ll get a list of everything that happened across the ancient Mediterranean for that year, including links to sources and to the index of names.

The index of names is another awesome feature of the site.  You can browse by name alphabetically or you can search for someone in particular:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

A search for Scipio produces a list of every Scipio attested in the historical record, starting with the earliest:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

Scrolling down to look in detail at Scipio #5, L. Cornelius Scipio Barbatus (the oldest member of the Scipiones to be buried in the famous tomb of the Scipios), we can see that he was consul in 298, that there’s a CIL inscription of the epitaph on his coffin, and that the Fasti Capitolini show that he was censor (clicking on the link reveals his censorship was in 280 BCE).  Obviously, for some of the Scipiones there is even more information.

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

The next feature I’d like to look at is the concordance to the Greek inscriptions (it’s more user-friendly than Claros for the uninitiated). Attalus.org allows you to search for a word or a name in the body of the inscriptions that it has catalogued online. You can also browse by region.

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

If I happen to be looking for inscriptions about Pompey the Great, I can put in the first few letters of Pompey’s name in the search box and get a list of results:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

Attalus.org lists two translated inscriptions and I can click on them to go to the external websites where the translations are hosted. Note that at the top Attalus.org provides me with a list of the collections of translations that it has searched for references to Pompey. There are certainly many more inscriptions about Pompey the Great (some translated, some not) — but because I know what has already been searched, I don’t have to worry about duplicating the work.

You can also browse translated inscriptions by region:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

Clicking on the links will again lead me to the external websites where the translations are hosted.

By far my favorite feature of the website is the list of online translations of the ancient authors.  In my experience the translations linked to are reliably good, although sometimes the only translations available freely online are very out of date (and of course Attalus.org is not to blame for availability).  When I need an online translation for an ancient author, I always start here:

database ancient authors inscriptions epigraphy translations ancient history

The authors are listed alphabetically and the left-hand column includes the abbreviations used for each text. The right-hand column provides links to external websites where the translations are hosted (if there are translations — Attalus.org lists authors without online translations, too, and notes that there are no online translations in lieu of a link). You can jump to the beginning of any letter in the alphabetical list by clicking on the letter links at the top.  There is also a brief list of online versions of Collections of Sources of Documents and even some Modern works.

To sum up:

  1. Attalus.org has a list of all the events that happen all over the Mediterranean in a given year for the years 324-30 BCE
  2. The website has lists of online translations of many Greek inscriptions and a complete list of all online translations for ancient authors.
  3. It is my first stop when looking for an online translation of an ancient source

 

~m

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s