Five tips for… exam season!

Final exams and paper grading are upon us. At this busy time, we know that you want distractions — but maybe not really long distractions. So here are our best tips for powering through the end of the semester as painlessly as possible!  Continue reading

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Help with Research: Recognizing a Fake Publisher

Since the demise of Beall’s List, it’s become increasingly difficult to recognize a predatory publisher. That does not mean that it’s any less important to recognize who’s legitimate and who’s not. In the original publishing post, I mentioned this topic briefly as part of Tip #2. But based on the unscientific survey of “people who spam my inbox,” the number of predatory publishers is growing, and therefore is worth its own post. In this post, I offer a few tips for avoiding a bad deal, as well as reasons why you should not publish at any cost.

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Help with bibliographies: APh Updated!

As practicing classicists will know, the field’s major bibliographic database, L’Année Philologique, moved to a new home late last year. That means that our previous posts on the EBSCO and self-hosted versions of APh are a little out of date. In this post, we update the major points about how to use the new APh interface. You should still refer to the previous posts for information about what this database is, its history, and why you should use it.  Continue reading

Help with Writing: Word Advanced, part 3

And we’re back to Word! This time, we tackle the Layout panel. The functions here are most useful for teaching, but some techniques transfer over to longer documents, such as books or theses. In this post, I’ll cover columns, breaks, and line numbers. There are other tools in the Layout panel, like word wrapping, margins, and alignment, but for the most part you won’t need to use these tools in a classical studies environment. If you think we should cover them, let us know on social media or in the comments! Continue reading

Help with Writing: Word Advanced, Part 2a

This post is dedicated to Track Changes. I mean dedicated in both senses — it’s the only thing I talk about in this post, and also Track Changes deserves special recognition as possibly the most useful tool in the MS Word arsenal. Are you working with a colleague on a document? You’ll need Track Changes (it’s more functional than Google docs for academic collaboration). Are you working with a publisher to get your article out? Most, although not all, of them use Track Changes for copyediting. Are you trying to save the environment by grading paper-free? One of the easiest ways to do that is (you guessed it) Track Changes. If you, like me, are already a heavy user, this post is probably not for you. And I’m sorry: it took me so long to explain how wonderful Track Changes is that it will be next week’s post, too.

On the other hand, if you are new to the world of Track Changes or really need a refresher, read on!

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